1 easy diet change to lose weight and be healthier

 

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Do you drink sodas regularly? Are you trying to lose weight or get into the best shape you can be?

Many people, when faced with a thirst start to reach for an ice cold soda. What they may not realize is that sodas are not thirst quenchers, in fact they can make you continually thirsty. Before I get into the information let me share that I occasionally have a soda. My favorite is cherry coke. I’m not condemning soda drinkers and it’s ok to have a soda from time to time. But they shouldn’t be a daily occurrence.

Now, lets examine three key ingredients and their effects to understand why.

The Sugary Salty Caffeine Loop!

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Sweeteners – One of the key ingredients in sodas are sweeteners, usually in the form of sucrose or high fructose corn syrup. You may see some sodas label “natural” as if it’s some how better. In the end though, sugar is sugar and your body’s response to it is the same.  Our bodies crave sugar and sodas are packed with it! Regular sodas contain massive amounts of sugar. An example to give you an idea is a sugar packet. A typical sugar packet contains roughly 4g of sugar. A 20oz bottle of coca cola contains about 65g. That means you’re drinking over 16 packets of sugar in one 20oz coke!! What would you think if you saw someone dump 16 packets of sugar into their coffee?

Salt – Drinking the same 20oz soda will also cause you to consume 75mg of sodium. Now why is so much sodium needed for a sweet drink? Well it helps keep it fizzy, and your body, just like with sweets, craves salt. It also makes you thirsty. But the salty is masked by the sweet.

Caffeine – Caffeine can give you that boost during the day that you desire to stay productive. However, this stimulant is also very hard on your adrenal glands and can become addictive over long periods of continued use. Requiring you to up the dosage to get the same effect. Caffeine is also a mild diuretic and can cause you to get rid of free water.
Fun Snippet of information. Often times sodas are paired up with salty, greasy foods at restaurants to off balance the flavors. When your body gets overloaded with too much of one type of food it sends signals to your brain to stop. This is why you might eat some greasy, salty or sweet food and then feel the need to stop. By drinking a sweet soda it washes away the salty and greasy taste allowing you to buy more and eat more food at the restaurant. Another reason to drink water!

Now lets combine the loop!

Alright, so you are thirsty and need something to drink. You consume a soda in order to quench your thirst. However, you didn’t give your body what it actually desired. Instead of quenching your thirst with a valuable liquid such as water. You consumed a liquid loaded with sugar which will quickly convert to FAT! Next you are taking in a healthy dose of salt which is not a helpful thirst quencher, and in fact, can make you thirstier! Finally you get a jolt of energy from the caffeine, which your body will come to want. The worst part of all of this is that you never satisfied your thirst. Instead you are on an artificial sugar and caffeine induced high and you’re still thirsty. What do you do next? Well, you’re still thirsty, so you drink another soda, then another, and so on.

How much weight would you gain from just 1 soda?

Assuming you were not gaining or losing weight on your current diet, if you were to drink just 1  soda a day then you could end up gaining upwards of 35lbs!!! 35lbs??? That is a serious amount of weight!

So If you currently drink sodas on a regular basis and are trying to lose weight. Stop! Instead stick with water and enjoy actually quenching your thirst as well as giving your body what it needs. If you need the caffeine boost start drinking teas or coffee. Oh, enjoy the accelerated 35lbs of weight loss!

Why do people train at Derby City MMA?

So the other day I went around with the camera asking people, “Why do you train at Derby City MMA?”

No one was prepared for the camera or the question. The reactions and answers were pretty funny.

 

Post Training Smoothie (Tastes like cookie butter)

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Whether you’re training Brazilian Jiu-jitsu, Boxing, Crossfit or any of the other options we offer at the gym. After training you need to get nutrients into your body as fast as possible to get dem gainz. I’m joking, but seriously, after a strenuous training session it’s important to throw some crabs and protein back into your system as soon as possible.  One of the easiest ways to do this is with a protein smoothie.

Cookie Butter Protein Smoothie

You’ll need. . .

– 1 Scoop of Cookies & Cream Protein Powder (I’ve really liked the Ump cookies and cream by Beverly Nutrition but just find a cookies and cream version you like.)

– A Spoonful of Creamy Almond Butter

– Cinnamon (to taste)

– 1 Banana 

– Unsweetened Vanilla Almond Milk (Of course you can use water, coconut water, milk or whatever you like)

Mix all the stuff above in a blender and you’ve got yourself a delicious protein smoothie with carbs that tastes similar to cookie butter. It will help cure that sweet craving you may have and give you something tasty to look forward to after training.

Kids BJJ Competition in Louisville, KY

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Kids BJJ Tournment in Louisville, KY

Last Friday we had an In House competitions for the Kids BJJ class. This was a great chance for the kids to experience the intensity of a BJJ competition in a controlled environment. This will help them if they ever do a kids BJJ competition in the future. It also tests the kids mentally. They exert themselves much more when their parents are watching and they have something on the line. But it’s a good thing! A little pressure and the thrill of winning or the sting of losing helps build character and self-reliance.

I’m very proud of all the kids who participated. They gave their full effort during the competition and tested their skills. Most importantly to me though was that during the stress and exertion brought on by the kids bjj competition they all maintained sportsmanlike conduct. They were respectful to one another after every match. This is tough sometimes during a competition because emotions run high. But each one of the kids maintained disciplined even in loss.

Again, I’m very proud of the kids in our Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu program and I’m looking forward to our next event!

Louisville Brazilian Jiu-jitsu Develops Confidence in Teen (Interview)

If you are interested in Brazilian Jiu-jitsu, Self-Defense, a way to develop confidence or improve fitness. Whether for yourself or a child. You should definitely keep reading.

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Recently I was thinking about one of my students Ryan Jacobs. He’s a kid that I’ve watched grow up in front of my eyes over the last nearly 5 years. He’s such an awesome young man and he’s grown so much since he started his Brazilian Jiu-jitsu training here at Derby City MMA. I asked Ryan 10 questions so that he could give you a bit of a feel for who he is, why he trains and how the training has helped him personally.

Below in bold are the questions I asked and the answers are directly below.

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1.How old were you when you began training at Derby City MMA?
When I began training at DCMMA I was 13 years old.

2.How old are you now?
Currently I am 17 years old.

3.What made you begin training Brazilian Jiu-jitsu at Derby City MMA?
What made me start training in Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu at DCMMA is that I was being bullied at my old middle school. I transferred to a new middle school to try and get a fresh start but when I started getting bullied again my dad thought it would be best of me to try and learn to defend myself. So I started coming to DCMMA.

4.Do you think BJJ and training at Derby City have had a positive impact on your life, if so, how?
I know that DCMMA has had a positive impact on my life. Training has helped me lose weight, get in shape, and gave me the confidence to live my life without fear of being oppressed by others.

5.Have you ever competed in Brazilian Jiu-jitsu before?
I have competed in numerous tournaments throughout these last, almost 5, years. I have a drawer in my nightstand full of all of the medals I have received from the competitions.

6.Have you ever needed to use your training outside of the gym, such as a confrontation with a bully?
I use my training every single day when I go out. That said I haven’t been in a single fight since I started training. No I use my training because I know that if any average person on the street tried to mess with me I could end it. It’s easy to stand tall when you can protect yourself.

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7.Why do you continue to train BJJ at Derby City and what makes it so fun for you personally?
I continue to train in BJJ at DCMMA because I enjoy competing with every one in the gym to make ourselves stronger. Every day is like a competition, you don’t always win, but when you do it’s a great feeling. I also enjoy staying in shape and talking to all of the wonderful people there.

8.During your time at Derby City. Do you have a favorite moment or accomplishment that stands out in your memory?
I experience my favorite memory every time I walk onto the mat. I always remember the wonderful tired feeling I get after training as long as I gave it all I had and ran myself ragged. This amazing memory is what helps me push myself to train as hard as I do every day.

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9.What would you say to someone who is thinking about trying BJJ at Derby City MMA but is intimidated, nervous or scared?
BJJ has a steep learning curve. There’s a lot of technique and it’s very tiring on your body. It will take months of constant training before you begin to feel as if you have an idea of what you are doing. That being said if you constantly train and really embrace the sport, it will be one of the best decisions of your life. It’s a wonderful skill to have under your belt and knowing it makes you feel like you are part of a special club.

10.What are your plans after high school?
After high school I plan on attending the University of Louisville, and afterwards to go onto the University of Louisville’s School of Dentistry to become a dentist.

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Thanks again to Ryan for sharing his story and answering the questions above.

I just wanted to share one of my favorite stories. Ryan’s father brought him in to begin his training. As Ryan told you in his own words, he was being picked on and needed some form of self defense. Well the bully problem was no longer a problem shortly after he began training in Brazilian Jiu-jitsu. Then not too long after he started (around 2 months I believe), he won his first BJJ tournament. I still remember the look on his father’s face when he watched him go out there in a person-on-person sport and excel. A far cry from being physically unable to stand up for himself.

Click Here To Call 502-937-8797 To Schedule a FREE Introductory Class.

Louisville Teen Uses BJJ To Defeat Bully

Louisville Teen Uses BJJ To Defeat Bully

So I wanted to share my student’s story. This week he came into my Wednesday NO GI class sporting a black eye. I assumed it was just an accident from training. However, he proudly informed me that it was from an altercation at his high school. He went on to tell me how he was able to effectively defend himself without even throwing a punch!  This reminds me why BJJ is such an effective form of self defense.

 

I really wanted to share his story on video because I get these sorts of stories all the time by my younger students. Let me stress that I don’t encourage violence, but I DO encourage my students to stand up for themselves.

When I grew up in Louisville I went to a rough middle and high school and know what it feels like to be bullied. I take great pride in offering an effective BJJ system which will help physically empower my students. Again, I know from personal experience, once I was able to stand up to my bullies, I was a new kid.

If you are getting bullied or are the parent of a bullied child. Call us and let us do what we can to help. With the training in our gym we can help to make your child stronger, both physically and mentally. We can also give them the physical abilities to effectively defend themselves.

If you’re interested in BJJ and live in Louisville. Either input your information in the boxes we have on our website or Click Here To Call 502-937-8797 To Try a Free Class and Claim a Free T Shirt

If for some reason you don’t live in Louisville but have come across this page. Research Brazilian Jiu-jitsu in your area and enroll your child. Again, I can’t stress enough the positive impact BJJ can make. It really can change the life of someone for the better.

-Chewy

 

 

 

Interview with Female BJJ Black Belt

This is a re post from my Blog at Chewjitsu.net. Be sure to check Katie’s blog out at http://skirtonthemat.wordpress.com/. Oh and I feel it’s worth noting that since this blog was originally published Katie won the Pans and also received a Black Belt. 

 

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Hows the men to women ratio at your gym? I’m sure it’s similar to most gyms and significantly more men train. However, I can say that right now, there are more women training Brazilian Jiu-jitsu at my gym than ever before and I think its fantastic! With all the new women in the gym I asked them if there is anything that they were particularly interested in regarding BJJ. Many of them shared the same desire to hear from high level females in the BJJ community. I decided to reach out to a few of the women I know and ask them some questions.

We will start with Katie’s responses first. First off big thanks to Katie at http://skirtonthemat.wordpress.com/ for her insights on what its like to be a woman in BJJ. The responses are genuine and detailed.  I hope you enjoy the question and answers listed below!

1.       Tell me about yourself (Name, rank, years training, your line of work, any other info you’d like to share)

Katie, brown belt, 7 years this August, marketing coordinator for a real estate company, writer of SkirtontheMat, bookworm, klutz, etc. I currently train at Maxercise Academy in Philadelphia.  http://www.maxercise.com/Home.html

2.       What got you started in training?

The simple answer to that is I was working at the front desk of the academy at the time, and it was suggested I try out the class. It wasn’t my first encounter with grappling or even jiu jitsu: I have an older brother who wrestled in highschool and college, so being unexpectedly put into a clinch wasn’t really that foreign of a concept. Additionally, I can be pretty clumsy-so falling to the ground is not a terribly foreign concept either. Also while in college I was a part of the school’s radio station, and became friends with some of my co-hosts who were big fans of MMA: we would get together at someone’s house and watch UFC (back when it was once every 3 months or so) or Pride fights. I was interested in it, but also back then I was a lot more shy and it took someone encouraging me to try the sport. I took my first class, and it actually wasn’t until I took a second and third class that I really started to get a hang of it and started to enjoy myself.

3.       Did you have any initial fears about training, if so how/when did you get over those?

Um, there was an initial anxiety, partially because everyone is naturally anxious in new situations. Additionally I think women are often encouraged to avoid full contact sports, which is really the biggest objection I hear when I talk to other women about trying jiu jitsu. Third, I had gained a lot of weight when I was in school which made me feel insecure. Not that I’ve ever been described as tiny, but the college lifestyle had definitely taken its toll. I would be partnered with someone to train, and especially in the beginning when you could obviously tell the weight discrepancy, and there were times I almost felt the need to apologize to my partner for being so…big. There’s no better way I can describe it. There were a variety of initial fears, including competition, which is completely natural: it’s not often you’re asked to get up in front of a bunch of people and try your hardest to choke someone or manipulate their joints in a way that could potentially injure them. But I find that facing those competition fears can lend to facing other anxieties, etc. in everyday life. You have already proven you can be anxious or scared of something, still “put your big girl pants on” and try your best, which I feel is an invaluable experience.

As what got me past anxiety about training, I think part of it had to do with the fact that I started to see results, belt changes, weight loss, a boost in confidence. For the most part the other students and instructors were patient and helpful, and it was pretty fun. I’m also goal oriented, and jiu jitsu became something I wanted to get better at, which kept me motivate to press on. Hooray for being stubborn and stuff. :)

4.       What drives you to continue training?

A variety of reasons: I love puzzle/problem solving, and each training session has the potential to present a puzzle that needs to be solved. Also, personally it’s a great way to relieve stress. We all worry and sometimes over-think a situation, over-analyze conversations throughout the day, and a good hard training session is a great way to see “the forest for the trees” again- a way to kind of reset your perspective. The community is also a big aspect for me as well: we are very fortunate to have a great team with people from all walks of life coming through the door and welcomed onto the mats. We train hard, respect and support one another, even if that means pushing a fellow student to help them reach their goal.

5.       What has been the biggest challenge of your BJJ career?

Ha, I have the same challenge as a lot of people- myself. Well, not me specifically. I think a lot of people, are hard on themselves and how well they do: in competition and sometimes even sparring.  While a lot of this sport is physical and muscle memory, there is a lot of thinking, and particularly believing in yourself and your technique, and there is a tendency to lose sight of that. We toil, day in and out on these myriad of minute details- put your hand here, place your foot there, make sure you have just the right angle, match after match during training sessions that I think it’s easy to get lost and not really see the big picture. We beat ourselves up over a submission we didn’t get, all the while completely ignoring the beautiful sweep that was executed in the very same match. It’s a bit funny, and frustrating at times.

6.       Are you a competitor, if so why do you compete?

Er, by technical definition, I guess I would say yes, I am a competitor: I train a lot, work out, diet, attend competitions and I enjoy competing in the fact that I feel accomplished win or lose if I step off the mat and really feel I put my skills to the test. I don’t really keep track of how many matches I have won, I’ve given most of my medals to the gym (I couldn’t even tell you which ones were mine), and instead I think about what I could have done better, and have even taken notes after a competition on things that I need to work on, using that opportunity to grow and advance as a jiu jitsu player (jiu jitsuka, whatever we’re calling ourselves these days).

 

7. Are there any resources or helpful tools that you use or would recommend to someone who trains?

Instructor, really would be my answer. I dabble here and there looking at Youtube videos, particularly if there is something I want to work on and I need to brush up on. There’s no one video channel I’m particularly attached to, though I like what I have seen so far from the BJJ Library. There are some cool things someone at an equal or higher rank will show that I’ll play around with to see if it will fit into my game, but the main thing is I’m a visual and kinesthetic learner: I have to see the technique being done to someone else, and then I need to do it myself to fully understand it. I am more concerned about what I learn during class or on the mats that I can drill, reference with a higher rank and drill again, rather than some crazy video I watched maybe once or twice.

 

8. Any funny story you’d like to share?

One of the fun things about traveling for competitions is there’s at least one good story, one memory you’ll take with you, regardless of winning or losing. We all went out together to this past year’s Pans: one of our blue belt guys competed, lost his first match, and came back to where we were sitting in the stadium to share with us,

“So, I went up to the acai stand the the guy was telling me how this stuff on top is good for memory, and this [topping] was great for athletes…I asked if he had anything for shame. He didn’t say anything.”

There are tons of moments you’ll gather throughout the years: if you have the time and means, one of the great things about jiu jitsu is the opportunity to travel for (usually for competition) to new places and meet new people, and you’ll have the opportunity to create a lifetime of memories.

 

9. Have you ever had to use your BJJ to protect yourself?

Fortunately, no. I am glad to know the self defense stuff and some judo, but also immensely glad that I have never had a need to use either: I am a big believer in being aware of your surroundings, and listening to your instinct when it’s telling you something’s not right.

10. How do you deal with training in a predominantly male sport?

When it comes to being a woman in jiu jitsu, there are some things that are great and then some elements that just suck. And, there are some decisions that are made when it comes to women, particularly divisions in tournaments where you think “who the hell thought that was a good idea?” And don’t even get me started about some of the gi choices. Yikes. Thankfully I think they stopped making the pink camouflage gi’s. Also, fortunately as the years go on and more women become involved in the sport, I think there will be less issues. There are some that will still persist however, particularly on a more local level. You’ll have men who enter an academy and doubt a woman’s ability due to their gender, there’s still a good chance when a woman will be the only female in a class- which being the token member of the opposite gender can be just as awkward the other way around. The sport in general has a high rate of attrition, and it’s extremely noticeable when it comes to women, which leads to a lot of competing against the same women in tournaments, even at national levels. We take these things in stride for the love of the sport. There is hope though: while our voice is still a small one in the jiu jitsu community, it is growing especially as more females become black belts.

 

11. Anything you’d like to share with females out there?

Um. nothing that I can think of- if anyone has a question for me I’ll be happy to answer; they can email me at thatclassybroad at gmail, go through you, whatever, but there’s nothing in particular that comes to mind.

As always, thanks for reading! Feel free to share any comments or thoughts in the section below or by email at chewjitsu@gmail.com .

MMA gym turns 3 average guys into MMA fighters

 

Louisville MMA gym turns 3 an average guys into MMA fighters

 

So one of the awesome things about of our gym, I think, is the lack of the elitist mentality. I’ve met coaches in various sports and athletic activities that won’t have anything to do with people that don’t immediately stand out.

I can’t tell you how much I dislike this mindset, because while I have competed successfully in the highest level of competition Brazilian Jiu-jitsu has to offer and fought for 6 years in MMA without any losses. This wasn’t always the case. When I first got into athletics as a kid I wasn’t a standout. Initially I was overweight and very uncoordinated. The one thing I did have was work ethic and more importantly, coaches who gave me a chance and took me under their wing. I firmly believe that if my coaches had possessed this elitist mentality I would have been shooed away early on and wouldn’t be where I am today.

So when I see someone come into the gym who is a little heavier, unconfident or lacks natural ability. I empathize with them and I get excited to teach them. For me these kind of people are like I was and a true test to a my ability as a coach. In my eyes as a coach if I can take the diamond in the rough and make them into something, it means I’m a good coach.  And I have to admit there is something incredibly satisfying as a coach when you watch someone make this positive transformation and know that you had a part in it.

Now let’s talk about 3 individuals who have made this change! Below are stories about 3 people who came into Derby City MMA overweight, with little confidence or simply didn’t fit the mold of what a fighter is “supposed” to be.  I hope that after reading these stories you understand that the training here at Derby City MMA isn’t about who you are now but about who you can become.

Average Guy #1

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Ben Walker was a guy that couldn’t make it through warm ups without wheezing. If my memory serves me correct he was nearly 307lbs and had medical issues which were a result of his lifestyle. Not exactly your ideal candidate for a competitor. He did know how to work hard though, and for our coaches, that’s all we needed.

When he started training it didn’t take long till he was down to 255lbs and competing in Brazilian Jiu-jitsu tournaments. During his first competition he had 15 matches. For anyone that has ever competed you know that 1 match can leave you exhausted. Let alone 15! Not bad for a guy who couldn’t finish warm ups less than 6 months prior. From that point on whether he was doing Brazilian Jiu-jitsu, Boxing, Wrestling or MMA he was working hard and continually pushing himself.

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After getting back to his regular training schedule following a brief slump because of his job, Ben competed successfully in his first MMA fight. He was able to defeat his opponent in just over a minute.  For Ben, when he first stepped on the mats as an overweight 307lbs MMA fan, fighting in the cage was something he dreamed about doing. It was on his bucket list so-to-speak. When Ben came walking out of the cage with his hands raised I can’t tell you how excited I was, because I knew what it meant to him.

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Ben is now a Blue Belt in Brazilian Jiu-jitsu and is looking to fight in MMA again in the near future.

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Average Guy #2

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Ben Fowler is currently one of my purple belts and is one of the toughest guys in the gym. Ask anyone in here and they’ll tell you. Ben was another one of the guys that came into the gym overweight and lacking in confidence. It initially took him months just step foot into the gym. He was intimidated, as most people are, by the whole idea of Brazilian Jiu-jitsu, Boxing and MMA. Once he was in the gym though, he trained hard and began to lose weight and win competitions in Brazilian Jiu-jitsu. After slimming down by 100lbs he stepped into the ring for his first MMA fight. This was the same night as my last fight and I have to say, it was a lot fun competing side by side with one of my guys.

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Ben will be the first to tell you that when he first came into the gym he was an MMA fan and wanted to fight in MMA. But at the time fighting wasn’t something he believed he could do. But he overcame the mental obstacles of self-doubt and made it happen.


Average Guy #3

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Matt Holthaus, or as we called him, Floppy, was another one of those guys that came into the gym that didn’t really fit the mold of what you expect from the next guy you’re going to coach as a fighter. He came into the gym as an engineering student at the University of Louisville who had wrestled a bit in high school. He started off with Brazilian Jiu-jitsu and then quickly started training all the various disciplines like Boxing, Kickboxing, MMA and even did Crossfit. Flop (that’s what we all called him) was not exceptionally athletic or naturally gifted starting off but again he made up for this with sheer grit, hard work and determination. One of the more impressive feats I saw him accomplish was during a no time limit submission-only Brazilian Jiu-jitsu tournament. He got battered and tossed around for 15 minutes. After defending submission after submission his opponent got tired and Flop sprung up from the ground, jumped on his opponent’s back and secured the choke for the win. I still talk about this match to my newer students when discussing being mentally tough and being able to survive.

Flop’s first MMA fight ended up being a no show. His opponent backed out at the last minute. A sad but common occurrence at the amateur level of MMA. That same night our buddy, and Flop’s main training partner , Brandon, had his first fight. Brandon was a little different though. He was an ex rug player who pulled off body hair to get his blood pumping before a competition. A little more of what you might expect from a guy wanting to fight mma. Anyways, when Flop did have his first fight it went off without a hitch and he executed his gameplan perfectly.

387531_2387897895609_562152766_nFlop went on to fight for Derby City MMA for several years. Sadly, he ended up moving away from Louisville after he graduated to pursue his career as an engineer. But during his time here at our gym he won countless Brazilian Jiu-jitsu matches, grew into a well-rounded MMA fighter and is now a Brown Belt in Brazilian Jiu-jitsu. I still super proud of how far he has come and I speak for everyone at the gym when I say we all miss him.

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———-

These are simply 3 stories from our gym. I used them because of the far extremes they covered and to show you that it doesn’t matter where you are now. These guys came in to Derby City MMA with little to no noticeable athletic prowess and with a lot of hard work and the guidance of our coaches, turned themselves into decorated competitors and MMA fighters.

I also use these guys as examples because many coaches wouldn’t have given them the time of day. As I said before many coaches I know only care about the elite or the naturally talented. Myself and all the other coaches care about the talented but we understand the importance of the other ones. The people that don’t make a big splash right off the bat or aren’t particularly gifted initially. These guys deserve the same attention because they can be excellent. They just have to be willing to work hard and have good coaches.

If you’re someone who wants to learn Brazilian Jiu-jitsu, Boxing, Kickboxing, MMA or Crossfit but you feel like you’re not good enough or feel intimidated by the thought of a gym like ours. Use the stories above as an example. We are here as coaches to guide people every step of the way. It’s what we do, and we are passionate about what we do. Whether you want to be a fighter like the guys above or just want the fitness and community that comes from training like one. If you’re ready to work hard, we’re ready to get you there.

Thanks for reading!

Chewy

 

Click here for more information about Derby City MMA in Louisville, KY Click Here

Click Here To Call 502-937-8797 To Try a Free Class and Claim Your Free T Shirt

Are MMA gyms more valuable than regular gyms?

Are MMA gyms more valuable than regular gyms?

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A question I get time to time from people who are interested in training at our gym is whether it’s more expensive than a traditional gym.

 

The answer to this is Yes, and No.

 

Does it cost more money than most average gyms? Yes.

 

But here is a better question to ask. Is it more valuable than the average weight lifting gym? Again the answer in my eyes is yes, and I believe this is a better question to ask.

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I say this because how many times have we paid for a service and not received what we wanted? A pretty common example that I can relate to is paying a mechanic to fix a car. I once had a mechanic charge me less money but didn’t really fix the problem. Less than a week after the “repair” my car was acting up again. Soon after I went to a second mechanic and paid more money than the original because he said there were several issues, but in return I got what I wanted, my car was fixed. When you think of this story. Which was more expensive? The mechanic that charged me less but didn’t fix my issue, or the mechanic that charged me more but fixed the problem? For me personally, the first mechanic was by far more expensive.

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Paying for a gym membership is no different. You’re paying to in order to receive some sort of benefit. Our members come to our gym for lots of different reasons. Some are drawn in for fitness and the pursuit being in shape, we have kids and teens attempting to gain the skills and confidence to stand up to bullies, and then there are others  who want the techniques necessary to be successful in competition. We even have people that want to make friends and be a part of a big community. Your reasons could be similar or they could be different. Either way, we have coaches and the training in place to help you satisfy whatever your reasons for training are.

 

So what’s more expensive? Paying less for a gym membership where you don’t reach the goals or achieve the benefits you want, where you aren’t a part of a community and where you don’t have the motivation to come back week in and week out, or paying a little more for a membership where you do reach your goals and where you do feel a part of something bigger than yourself and where you do make changes that will affect your life for the better? I think at this point, you’ll agree that paying more money to receive what you want is less expensive. More importantly, its more valuable?  

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I can’t stress enough how life changing combat sports, fitness and a good gym can be. I know because they’ve changed my life personally, and it’s why I’m so passionate about this stuff. I know from experience how frustrating it can be to not look the way you want, to not feel the way you want and to feel unable to achieve what you want. That’s why myself and all of the coaches here at the gym are so motivated to make people better. This isn’t bullshit either. There is a reason why we have so many dedicated members that have been here anywhere from 5-10 years.

 

I’ve talked to a few of my assistant instructors and I tell them that I’m not in the gym business or just teaching martial arts. I’m in the business of building people up. I really believe that. I’ve seen first hand the positive changes this gym has made on people and it pumps me up. So if you’ve tried other gyms and just didn’t feel like it was for you. Give us a try and let us build you up. It still requires hard work and dedication on your part, but our we’ll do everything we can to help you get where you want.

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-Chewy

 

3 reasons why you shouldn’t wait to start training.

Before 275 Pounds!

Before 275 Pounds!

After 170 Pounds!

After 170 Pounds!

If you’re out of shape, should you wait to get into shape before starting Brazilian Jiu-jitsu, Boxing or MMA training?

 

This comes up a lot when I talk to people who are interested in training but have never done it before. Many times newcomers are attracted to Brazilian Jiu-jitsu or Boxing because they see it as an excellent way to get into shape, which it is. But it can also come across as a bit intimidating. Training has a certain look of intensity when viewed by someone who’s never trained. Even if the class isn’t really that grueling.

 

So back to the question. If you’re out of shape, should you wait to start training? My answer is almost always , “No you shouldn’t wait.”

 

Everyone seems to like bullets of information right? So I’ll give you 3 reasons why you should start now.

 

  1. The only way to get into shape for Boxing, BJJ or MMA is to do Boxing, BJJ or MMA. Regardless of how “in shape” you are, or think you are. Your body won’t be acclimated to the training and will putter out just the same. I’ve had plenty of people who are in shape, try classes out. Swimmers, weightlifters, basketball players, marathon runners and the list goes on. They tire out just the same in the beginning until they’re used to the training. If you’re not in shape you’re probably not going to get there on your own. If you’re not in the kind of shape you want to be in right now and are looking to Boxing, BJJ or MMA as a means to get into shape, why put it off? The reality is that unless you change something you are probably not going to get into shape. So let us help you make the change.
  2. We will build you up bit by bit. Even if you’re out of shape. The training is scaleable. Myself or any of the other instructors will not ask you to do anything that is not within your abilities at the time. We will push you to improve and will gradually push you beyond your limits or at least your perceived limits.
  3. The sooner you start the sooner you’ll reach your goals. Regardless of whether you’re getting into this thing for fitness, competitions or just to learn a new skill, the longer you wait the further you are from those goals. We are in the business of building people up and we are good at it. Generally speaking, we are all a little scared of change and nervous about pushing ourselves outside our comfort zone. But most often change is what spurs progress and growth in our lives. So don’t keep putting it off. If you want to train Brazilian Jiu-jitsu, Boxing, MMA or Crossfit. Just do it. It will be a change and it will tough at times. But the longer you put it off, the longer you go from reaching what you want.
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